Speckled Dun

The Speckled Dun. Daiichi 1180 #14 hook, Whiting CdL tails, Whiting Speckled Badger hackle, quill body, peacock thorax. The poly post is split, pulled to either side and kept that way by a tiny drop of UV epoxy. Next, the wing is clipped to shape

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Keith Fulsher’s Thundercreek

Keith Fulsher developed the Thundercreek series in the early 70s. Straight eye streamer hook, bucktail in the color of certain species of baitfish, tied in by the hair butts, extending over the hook eye and folded back. Add eyes and some varnish or resin on the head and you’re done. I first learned about them…

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Tilt Wing Dun

The hackling technique used in the E/C Caddis and the Hot Creek Caddis is also suitable for mayflies. Galloup developed the Tilt Wing Dun. Like many good patterns it can be adapted to taste. Below an Elk hair version and a different version that uses Snowshoe Hair. Hook: Daiichi 1180#14 Thread: Veevus 14/0 Abdomen: Quill, covered…

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Hot Creek Caddis

In 1981 Eric Cutter developed the idea of the E/C Caddis. That fly prompted the development of several other caddis flies tied with a parachute hackle wrapped under the wing and front part of the Elk hair.*  After him Eric Otzinger came up with the Hot Creek Caddis, intended for the stream of that name in…

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Klinkhammers

Having fun with hackle and hooks. Below: Quillhammer, Rope dubbed Klinkhammer, Hi-Viz Klinkhammer and the infamous Adamshammer. All tied with Whiting dry fly rooster saddle on # 14 Daiichi 1160 Klinkhammer hook.

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Taming the Humpy

In Tying Dry Flies, Randall Kaufmann notes that the Humpy is “arguably, the greatest surface fly ever devised. It represents nothing and everything … depending on its construction, the Humpy can represent caddisflies, stoneflies, mayflies, midges and terrestrials.” But the Humpy also has another reputation: as a difficult, frustrating pattern, a fly you ask your…

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Mart’s Peccary Paraloop Emerger

The Paraloop hackling technique has been described in great detail in Moutter’s book ‘Tying Flies the Paraloop Way’ (2001). Moutter notes that the technique is not new: before he came up with the technique and name, other tiers such as Ned Long and Bob Quigley used the same technique. There were two other names for…

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